Friday, September 9, 2011

Rope Making


Vines, grasses, rushes, barks, palms, and animal hairs can all be used to make rope or line. The stems of nettles make first-class ropes and those of honeysuckle can be twisted together to make tight lashings. The stronger the fiber, the stronger the rope. Some stiff fibers can be made flexible by steaming or warming. While pliable vines and other long plant stems can be used for short term purposes, they may become brittle as they dry out. A rope made from plant fibers that are twisted or plaited together will be more durable. The tendons from animal's legs also make good strings, but they tend to dry hard. Be creative! Keep your eyes open and do the best with what you can find.

32 comments:

  1. Aren't there specific techniques or methods to actually making the rope?

    Or is it as simple as twisting them around each other over and over?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I wonder how strong the rope would be..i presume it would have to support your body weight?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Never done this, but it seems like a cool trick.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Interesting post buddy, as others have said this looks hard to do, very hard. Let's hope it's something I never need to try! Cool blog in general so I'm following you now for more stuff like this.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well, I've actually done this with vines but I'm not sure about other materials.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Cool, but I can't image actually find enough animal tendons to do something like that.

    ReplyDelete
  7. when all hell breaks loose your blog is going to come quite in handy

    ReplyDelete
  8. braided palm tree leaves are great.

    ReplyDelete
  9. haha, I'm the master of this skill. In my country ( Vietnam) we use the coconut fiber to make these ropes, and they are really robust like hell.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm afraid all of us may be doing this pretty soon.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I remember being impressed when Tom Hanks did this in Castaway.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Now that's a tough one. If you got tender fingers, don't even think about it.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Do you think I would trust plants to hold my weight hanging down a cliff? D:

    ReplyDelete
  14. And if you really give up, you can use your home-made rope to hang yourself! Win-win situation!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Interesting. Post about the technique used to actually make the rope would be cool too.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Just as a human I would like to point out. Rope is good.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Actually tried making my own rope from time to time, always turned out horrible. Maybe Ill try it again with this haha.

    ReplyDelete
  18. id be the king of the camping trip!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Too cool. I was just thinking about this a couple days ago, actually, thinking back about having recently watched Castaway. Not that I plan on dangling myself neckways from a cliff anytime soon, mind you.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Making a rope! Now that could actualyl prove useful! :)

    ReplyDelete
  21. mmm even with your explanation still is not something really easy to do o.o i practiced a bit yet cannot do it well but still il manage to perfect it soon! thx for the info =3

    ReplyDelete
  22. That seems hard. Hopefully I get stranded near a home depot.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thanks! now I can rope my targets and won't lose any money on chloroform! Hell Yeah!
    Uhm... This is not what it looks like... [cough] *runs away*

    ReplyDelete
  24. where have you been Rob? Keep up the good posts please.

    ReplyDelete
  25. It must be extremely hard to make a rope! GREAT POST. Like always

    ReplyDelete
  26. rope can be made out of anything that you can get long enough i'm sure! i remember watching a mythbusters where they just happened to make a rope out of toilet paper... wtf!? right?

    ReplyDelete